Volcanoes

Nyamulagira volcano:

Nyamuragira (Derived from the Kinyarwanda verb 'Kuragira inka', meaning to herd cows; Inka means cow or cows) is an active volcano in the Virunga Mountains of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, situated about 25 km north of Lake Kivu.

It has been described[by as Africa's most active volcano and has erupted over 40 times since 1885. As well as eruptions from the summit, there have been numerous eruptions from the flanks of the volcano, creating new smaller volcanoes that have lasted only for a short time (e.g. Murara from late 1976 to 1977).

It erupted in 2010 and on 8 November 2011. Nyamalagria volcanos, is a big tourist attraction in the Congo. Nyamuragira is a massive high-pattassium basaltic shield volcano. there have been 43 eruptions form 1865-2011.

On the 2nd January 2010. The volcano spewed out lava fountains. There are no settlements near the active volcano so nothing was disturbed; except for the national park, the eruption spewed lava, smoke and ash throughout the national-park. leaving the everyone in shock.

Nyiragongo volcano:

Mount Nyiragongo is a stratovolcano in the Virunga Mountains associated with the Albertine Rift. It is located inside Virunga National Park, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, about 20 km north of the town of Goma and Lake Kivu and just west of the border with Rwanda. The main crater is about two km wide and usually contains a lava lake.

The crater presently has two distinct cooled lava benches within the crater walls – one at about 3175m (10,400 ft) and a lower one at about 2975 m (9800 ft). Nyiragongo's lava lake has at times been the most voluminous known lava lake in recent history. The depth of the lava lake varies considerably. A maximum elevation of the lava lake was recorded at about 3250 m (10,700 ft) prior to the January 1977 eruption – a lake depth of about 600 m (2000 ft). A recent very low elevation of the lava lake was recorded at about 2700 m (8800 ft). Nyiragongo and nearby Nyamuragira are together responsible for 40% of Africa's historical volcanic eruptions.

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